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pension

This tag is associated with 8 posts

Financial planning for social care in later life: the ‘shadow’ of fourth age dependency

On a day when the future financing of social care is the subject of a new announcement by the Coalition government, Ageing and Society publish our research on how older couples grapple with these matters: Financial planning for social care in later life: the ‘shadow’ of fourth age dependency Article by Debora Price, Dinah Bisdee, … Continue reading

Long term financial consequences of divorce – an issue that is not going away

I presented a paper last week at the Child and Family Law Quarterly Seminar, entitled ‘UK Pension Reform: Implications for Family Law’.  It meant looking up the latest stats, as well as collating some of our research on poverty in later life, and thinking about where we have got to on this issue, which affects … Continue reading

Pension Saving: What’s the Message?

Henry Tapper, in his recent blog post: ‘If you write as good as you talk – no one reads you’ suggests that there’s no use in any pensions/expert/guru/bore banging on whether in magazines or on blogs or conferences if nobody’s reading/listening.  He’s set himself a challenge to produce material that is ‘relevant, stimulating and fun and … Continue reading

Where does the proposed “£140 a week” for the new state pension come from?

A lot of people are wondering how the government has arrived at the figure of £140 a week for the proposed new state pension.  The justification I have heard (from a number of sources) for the apparently thumb-sucked figure is to ensure it is just above the Guarantee Credit ‘poverty line’, which is currently £137.35 … Continue reading

A new single tier state pension above the poverty line – is it fair?

Attending the HC Work and Pensions Committee yesterday to discuss the new proposed single tier pension as suggested in the Green Paper, “A State Pension for the 21st Century”, one idea was repeatedly raised by the MPs –  what to say to constituents who say that they contributed all their lives to National Insurance, only … Continue reading

The young, the old, and understanding well-being in later life

How should we engage children and young people in thinking about long term financial well-being?  I know this is a little off-piste, but I really do think that the greatest way to engage children in understanding of lifetime and lifecourse issues (of all kinds) is to encourage living in intergenerational communities. Where interacting with people … Continue reading

Should we vary state pension age automatically with increasing longevity?

One of the proposals under consideration with the new pensions Green Paper in the UK, A State Pension for the 21st Century, is that state pension age should vary under some sort of formula with increases in longevity.  This sounds so attractive – to take the politics out of longevity risk.  But it creates tremendous … Continue reading

The new state pension: age discrimination is not the answer

When the arguments for a much higher basic state pension that virtually eliminated means testing and associated moral hazards were being thrashed out years ago in the era of the Pensions Commission, support came from government, opposition, trade unions, employers, occupational schemes, the insurance sector, special interest groups and the voluntary sector.  The suprise really … Continue reading

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